Archive for April, 2014

Quick POC to mitm RDP ssl

Posted: April 21, 2014 in general, security
Tags: , , ,

So the other day I stumbled upon this great article from Portcullis Labs. The article explains how you can man-in-the-middle an RDP SSL connection. This can be helpful in obtaining the user’s password, like Portcullis explains in their article. As far as I could tell they didn’t release their tool, so I decided to see if I could whip up a quick POC script with a twist of saving the entire decrypted stream to a pcap file. This would put you in the position to maybe retrieve more sensitive data then just the password. Turns out the only modification from regular SSL intercepting code is more or less the following:

    #read client rdp data
    serversock.sendall(clientsock.recv(19))
    #read server rdp data and check if ssl
    temp = serversock.recv(19)
    clientsock.sendall(temp)
    if(temp[15] == '\x01'):

Like you can see we just pass through the initial packet and then just check the response packet for the ‘SSL’ byte before we start intercepting. The output is pretty boring, since everything is saved to the file ‘output.pcap’:

sudo ./rdps2rdp_pcap.py 
waiting for connection...
('...connected from:', ('10.50.0.123', 1044))
waiting for connection...
Intercepting rdp session from 10.50.0.123
some error happend
some error happend

You can ignore the errors, that’s just me being lazy for this POC. The output is saved in ‘output.pcap’ which you can then open with wireshark or further process to extract all the key strokes. If you want to play around with the POC you can find it on my github as usual. If you plan on extracting the key strokes make sure you look for the key scan codes and not for the hex representation of the character that the victim typed. In case you are wondering, yes , extracting the key strokes is left as an excersise for the user :)

 

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