Archive for the ‘general’ Category

An IP whitelist is one of the many measures applied to protect services, hosts and networks from attackers. It only allows those that are on the IP whitelist to access the protected resources and all others are denied by default. As attackers we have multiple obstacles to overcome if we want to bypass this and not always will it be possible. In my personal opinion there are two situation in which you will end up as an attacker:

  1. You are NOT on the same network as your target
  2. You are on the same network as your target

In the first situation you will (generally speaking) not be able to access or influence the network traffic of your target. This in turn enables the TCP/IP mechanisms to be useful and prevent you from accessing the resources, although maybe not prevent you from discovering who is on the whitelist.

In the second situation you will (generally speaking) be able to access or influence the network traffic of your target. This enables us as attacker to identify as well as bypass IP restrictions, by manipulating the TCP/IP protection mechanisms, to gain access to the protected resources.

For both situations there is an often overlooked detail which is: how do you know which IPs are on the whitelist? Mostly it is just assumed that either you know that upfront or discover that due to a connection being active while you initiate your attack. In this blog posts we’ll discuss the two situations and describe the techniques available to identify IPs on whitelist which have no active connection. A small helper script can be found here.

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YARA for pentesters

Posted: December 25, 2017 in general
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YARA is a pattern matching swiss army knife often used by malware researchers. The strength of YARA is to quickly and easily identify files based on rules which are mostly aimed at identifying byte patterns. This aides malware researches, threat intelligence and forensic investigators to identify malware samples.

We can of course use the same approach to identify files containing juicy information which like always will hopefully aid us to pwn some network somewhere. Most of the files that we use like ntds.dit/registry hives reside at fixed location or at the bare minimum at configurable locations. This usually causes us to write pretty awesome scripts to retrieve and process these files to get the juicy info. YARA can be a nice tool to account for the unexpected events of system administrators placing these and many other files in unexpected locations.

To start with the end result, let’s see the results of searching for file with passwords (loosely used to also identify hashes) inside a directory:

sudo yara -r -t hashed_passwords juicy_files.txt /etc
shadow_file /etc/shadow
shadow_file /etc/shadow-

and if we do this inside a directory which contains some test files:

yara -r -t hashed_passwords juicy_files.txt files
shadow_file files/shadow
hive_file files/mysecurity
hive_file files/mysam
hive_file files/system
ntds_file files/ntds.dit
hive_file files/mysystem

Like you can imagine you can use this approach to search entire filesystems at once as well as network shares. Since the rules are very powerful and easy to write I think it’s much easier to maintain a repository of rules instead of custom scripts for each juicy file that we encounter during our pwnage. You can find the repository over here, feel free to commit more rules :)

Lately I’ve had to deal with setups which had transparent full disk encryption and were pretty hardened. If you are wondering what ‘transparent full disk encryption’  means, that’s how I call solutions that encrypt your hard disk, but don’t require any interaction from the user to boot into the operating system. They usually accomplish this because they:

  • use secure boot and a TPM with key sealing (good)
  • they use proprietary software-only obfuscation to hide the key (bad)
  • use an external hardware device to store the keys without secure boot or key sealing (bad)

Most of the time the goal is to break out of a preconfigured application and the usual tricks like these ones, don’t really work:

However getting access to safe mode / start up repair does partially work for some of these setups:

Partially, because most of the options were not present and those that were present only gave me a cmd.exe which was disabled with a local group policy. An interesting approach the defence side took was replacing explorer.exe with an executable which did nothing. Even if you managed to break out of their application you still had nothing, no desktop, no menu, no buttons etc. For a few setups where the ‘startup-repair’ options seemed to work the encryption drivers did not load, resulting in an environment with no access to the target disk. In case you were wondering about network attacks, those were a no go as well, since the firewalls were strictly configured for ingress and egress traffic, based on ip/port/application and yes the connection themselves used TLS with client certificates and not vulnerable to man in the middle attacks.

Usually when I encounter these environment it still is possible to perform a variety of Direct Memory Access (DMA) attacks using tools like inception or pcileech. In these cases however this was physically not possible, either because there were no DMA ports available or just because I didn’t have the correct hardware with me to perform the attacks.

A common issues with all those setups however was the fact that the disk encryption software did not seal the encryption keys to a hardware security device like a TPM. This enables an attacker to create an image from the hard disk and boot this image on another computer. If the attacker also got a hold of the enclosure (USB key, smart card, obfuscated algorithm, unencrypted partition) holding the encryption keys it becomes possible to boot the disk image and fully control the victim disk in an untrusted environment.

In this blog article we are going to have a look at some of the things that you can do when you can boot a disk image of an otherwise unpenetrable environment. Please keep in mind that in part we are reinventing the wheel for two reasons:

  • Learning the nitty gritty details
  • Having a portable and understandable solution

There are solutions available that probably would enable you to achieve the same result, but for my personal taste I prefer to have something much more lightweight that can be easily ported between QEMU versions. Additionally you could also achieve the same result with the quick & dirty approach of booting the image in VMWare, pausing the machine, editing the memory file, resuming the machine. However I prefer QEMU since it allows full control over the entire process, due to the build in GDB server as well as customising the inner workings by editing/adding code and recompiling it. The following existing projects already wrap QEMU with cool and handy features if you want to use these type of setups to analyse malware or other applications:

Enough introduction of what we are going to do, let’s dive in and start elevating our shells to SYSTEM ;)
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A good periodic reminder when attempting to learn things is that reading about the subject is not the same as actually practicing the subject you read about. That is why it’s always a good thing to practice what you have read. In this case we are going to dive into the well known Java deserialization bugs that have been around for a while now. The best part of practicing it is that you get to really know the subject at hand and can attempt to improve upon it for your own needs. For this blog post we are going to attempt the following:

  1. Exploit a deserialization bug
  2. Manually create our payload

So to clarify, step one will be about practicing the exploitation of a serialization bug with current tools as well as explaining the approach taken. The second step zooms in on the payload; what exactly is the payload? How can we construct it by hand? With the end result of fully understanding how it works as well as having an approach to understand similar bugs in the future.

I’ll mention all tools used throughout the blog post, but at the very least you’ll need the following:

That is the bug we will be exploiting. The reason for choosing a simulated bug is the fact that we can control all aspects of it and thus better understand how a deserialization exploit really works.

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There are a ton of ways to brute force login forms, you just need to google for it and the first couple of hits will usually do it. That is of course unless you have Burp in which case it will be sufficient for most of the forms out there. Sometimes however it will not be so straight forward and you’ll need to write your own tool(s) for it. This can be for a variety of reasons, but usually it boils down to either a custom protocol over HTTP(S) or some custom encryption of the data entered. In this post we are going to look at two ways of writing these tools:

  • Your own python script
  • A Greasemonkey script

Since to write both tools you first need to understand and analyse the non-default login form let’s do the analysis part first. If you want to follow along you’ll need the following tools:

  • Python
  • Burp free edition
  • Firefox with the Greasemonkey plugin
  • FoxyProxy
  • FireFox developer tools (F12)

Please note that even though we are using some commercially available software as an example, this is NOT a vulnerability in the software itself. Most login forms can be brute forced, some forms slower than others ;) As usual you can also skip the blog post and directly download the python script & the Greasemonkey script. Please keep in mind that they might need to be adjusted for your own needs.

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By now everyone has probably heard of Quantum Insert NSA style, if you haven’t then I’d recommend to check out some articles at the end of this post. For those who have been around for a while the technique is not new of course and there have been multiple tools in the past that implemented this type of attack. The tools enabled you to for example fully hijack a telnet connection to insert your own commands, terminate existing connections or just generally mess around with the connection. Most of the tools relied on the fact that they could intercept traffic on the local network and then forge the TCP/IP sequence numbers (long gone are the days that you could just predict them).

So it seems this type of attack, in which knowing the sequences numbers aids in forging a spoofed packet, has been used in two very specific manners:

  • Old Skool on local networks to inject into TCP streams
  • NSA style by globally monitoring connections and injecting packets

There is a third option however that hasn’t been explored yet as far as i know, which is using this technique to bypass IP filters for bi-directional communication. You might wonder when this might come in handy right? After all most of the attackers are used to either directly exfiltrate through HTTPS or in a worst case scenario fall back to good old DNS. These methods however don’t cover some of the more isolated hosts that you sometimes encounter during an assignment.

During a couple of assignments I encountered multiple hosts which were shielded by a network firewall only allowing certain IP addresses to or from the box. The following diagram depicts the situation:

As you can see in the above diagram, for some reason the owner of the box had decided that communication with internet was needed, but only to certain IP addresses. This got me thinking on how I could exfiltrate information. The easiest way was of course to exfiltrate the information in the same way that I had obtained access to the box, which was through SSH and password reuse. I didn’t identify any other methods of exfiltration during the assignment. This was of course not the most ideal way out, since it required passing the information through multiple infected hops in the network which could attract some attention from the people in charge of defending the network.

A more elegant way in my opinion would have been to directly exfiltrate from the machine itself and avoid having a continuous connection to the machine from within the network. In this post we are going to explore the solution I found for this challenge, which is to repurpose the well known quantum insert technique to attempt and build a bi-directional communication channel with spoofed IP addresses to be able to exfiltrate from these type of isolated hosts. If you are thinking ‘this only works if IP filtering or anti address spoofing is not enforced’ then you are right. So besides the on going DDOS attacks, this is yet another reason to block outgoing spoofed packets.

If you are already familiar with IP spoofing, forging packets and quantum insert you can also skip the rest of this post and jump directly to QIBA – A quantum insert backdoor POC. Please be aware that I only tested this in a lab setup, no guarantees on real world usage :)

Lastly as you are probably used to by now, the code illustrates the concept and proofs it works, but it’s nowhere near ready for production usage.

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The last couple of days there has been some fuzz about the HP audio key logger as disclosed by modzero in their blog post and the detailed advisory that they released. The following sentence in their advisory peeked my interest:

This type of debugging turns the audio driver effectively into a keylogging spyware.

With all the hyped ‘repurposing’ of tools that is going on lately I wondered how difficult it actually is to turn this into an intended piece of malware. The reason I find this interesting is because according to different sources it’s legitimate software which has been code-signed correctly and has not been classified as malware by all anti-virus solutions, yet.

https://www.virustotal.com/nl/file/e882149c43976dfadb2746eb2d75a73f0be5aa193623b18b50827f43cce3ed84/analysis/

https://www.virustotal.com/nl/file/c046c7f364b42388bb392874129da555d9c688dced3ac1d6a1c6b01df29ea7a8/analysis/

The current detection signatures are also pretty weak since they deem it mostly ‘riskware’  or ‘potentially unwanted application (PUA)’. This could have the side effect that users or administrators might just dismiss any warnings of signs of an attacker abusing the HP audio key logger for malicious purposes.

For red team purposes this is still a nice addition, since it pushes the person analysing this potential incident to really understand what is going on and figuring out that legitimate software is being abused for malicious purposes. Specially since the binary will not be modified and thus the code-signing remains valid (until the certificate is revoked).

Let’s dive into the technical details on the path / approach I followed on repurposing this piece of legitimate software for nefarious red team purposes ;)

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