OBS: Presentation & slides side by side

This is just a quick blog on how you can quickly stitch together a video file of a presentation and the corresponding talk slides using Open Broadcaster Software (OBS). First time I did this I had to fiddle a little bit around, so this also serves as a mini tutorial for future me. Feel free to leave tips & tricks in the comments.

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Parsing atop files with python dissect.cstruct

Like you’ve probably read, Fox-IT released their incident response framework called dissect, but before that they released the cstruct part of their framework. Ever since they released it publicly I’ve been wanting to find an excuse to play with it on public projects. I witnissed the birth of cstruct back when I was still working at Fox-IT and am very happy to see it all has finally been made public, it sure has evolved since I had a look at the very first version! Special thanks to Erik Schamper (@Schamperr) for answering late night questions about some of the inner workings of dissect.cstruct.

This is one of those things that you can encounter during your incident response assignment and for which life is a bit easier if you can just parse the binary file format with python. Since with incident response you never know in which format exactly you want to receive the data for analysis or what you are looking for it really helps to work with tools that can be rapidly adjusted. python is an ideal environment to achieve this. An added benefit of parsing the structures ourselves with python is that we can avoid string parsing and thus avoid confusion and mistakes.

The atop tool is a performance monitoring tool that can write the output into a binary file format. The creator explains it way better than I do:

Atop is an ASCII full-screen performance monitor for Linux that is capable of reporting the activity of all processes (even if processes have finished during the interval), daily logging of system and process activity for long-term analysis, highlighting overloaded system resources by using colors, etc. At regular intervals, it shows system-level activity related to the CPU, memory, swap, disks (including LVM) and network layers, and for every process (and thread) it shows e.g. the CPU utilization, memory growth, disk utilization, priority, username, state, and exit code.
In combination with the optional kernel module netatop, it even shows network activity per process/thread.

The atop tool website

Like you can imagine, having the above information is of course a nice treasure throve to find during an incident response, even if it is based on a pre-set interval. For the most basic information, you can at least extract process executions with their respective commandlines and the corresponding timestamp.

Since this is an open source tool we can just look at the structure definitions in C and lift them right into cstruct to start parsing. The atop tool itself offers the ability to parse written binary files as well, for example using this commend:

atop -PPRG -r <file>

For the rest of this blog entry we will look at parsing atop binary log files with python and dissect.cstruct. Mostly intended as a walkthrough of the thought process as well.

You can also skip reading the rest of this blog entry and jump to the code if you are impatient or familiar with similar thought processes.

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